frenchmyway
frenchmyway:

Want to speak French? Here’s how an opera singer did it… 
For some people, the tricky part of learning a language is remembering what you learned.
Gabriel Wyner is an American opera singer who learned French in 5 months. In his 15-minute preview video on the Science of Memory, he provides an interesting account on how and why we memorize words and concepts. 
According to Wyner, words are more than just words in our mother tongue. They’re attached to sounds, emotions and connections. For example, you probably know the word “cookie” in English. 
When you think about a cookie you might think about its crunchiness, maybe the last time you ate one, or your favorite flavor. However, in another language, the same word wouldn’t remind you any of those feelings or memories. You might hear a word in another language but would forget it because it doesn’t link to a memory or feeling you might have had. 
At the same time, we don’t remember sounds but we remember concepts. For example if you hear “tigre” (in French this means “tiger”), you wouldn’t care much about word. Instead, if you were told you that a “tigre” is dangerous, you’d find this useful information if you came in contact with one. 
So concepts stick, and a great way to get words to stick is to use images. As we know that’s how we learn when we are children, and it works wonders. Wyner says that when you see an image of a cat, you don’t think about how the word has three letters, but that it meows and has nice fur. I have always been a big advocate of learning with images (that’s why I went through the pain to learn how to draw so I can illustrate my own language comic book!). 
When we associate an image to a word, our brain tries to make a connection with these two things and it forces us to think about concepts. The final stage to make sure the connection sticks is to connect it to something in your life. Instead of learning that cat is “le chat” in French, it would even stick better if you think about your own cat “Léon le chat”. 
I’m amazed that his pronunciation is impeccable! If you’re a musician I think you have an advantage because you can here the changes in tones and accents.  
I’m planning to pick up Gabriel’s book on memory and language learning “Fluent Forever” when it’s released in the next couple months. Stay tuned for my review of his book!

frenchmyway:

Want to speak French? Here’s how an opera singer did it…

For some people, the tricky part of learning a language is remembering what you learned.

Gabriel Wyner is an American opera singer who learned French in 5 months. In his 15-minute preview video on the Science of Memory, he provides an interesting account on how and why we memorize words and concepts.

According to Wyner, words are more than just words in our mother tongue. They’re attached to sounds, emotions and connections. For example, you probably know the word “cookie” in English.

When you think about a cookie you might think about its crunchiness, maybe the last time you ate one, or your favorite flavor. However, in another language, the same word wouldn’t remind you any of those feelings or memories. You might hear a word in another language but would forget it because it doesn’t link to a memory or feeling you might have had.

At the same time, we don’t remember sounds but we remember concepts. For example if you hear “tigre” (in French this means “tiger”), you wouldn’t care much about word. Instead, if you were told you that a “tigre” is dangerous, you’d find this useful information if you came in contact with one.

So concepts stick, and a great way to get words to stick is to use images. As we know that’s how we learn when we are children, and it works wonders. Wyner says that when you see an image of a cat, you don’t think about how the word has three letters, but that it meows and has nice fur. I have always been a big advocate of learning with images (that’s why I went through the pain to learn how to draw so I can illustrate my own language comic book!).

When we associate an image to a word, our brain tries to make a connection with these two things and it forces us to think about concepts. The final stage to make sure the connection sticks is to connect it to something in your life. Instead of learning that cat is “le chat” in French, it would even stick better if you think about your own cat “Léon le chat”.

I’m amazed that his pronunciation is impeccable! If you’re a musician I think you have an advantage because you can here the changes in tones and accents.  

I’m planning to pick up Gabriel’s book on memory and language learning “Fluent Forever” when it’s released in the next couple months. Stay tuned for my review of his book!

This isn’t a promo

But…. If any of you guys are interested then you should totally go follow my other blog, fruitfaithfitness.
It’s a more personal blog about my diet and exercise with some spiritual stuff in there.
It’s pretty crappy and I just started it but I’m here to support anyone that shares my interests or is just curious.

urashimajoe

How American to suggest that we should learn a new language because it’s good for us, improving our brain function, rather than because it’s a source of great pleasure.

I’ve been studying Italian for several years now, and it has deepened my appreciation of English, introduced me to new friends and new literature, and given me a broader understanding of the world.

Those benefits are in addition to the fact that, when you find a compatible teacher, the lessons themselves are fun.

And travel in Italy is even more of a delight than it was when I fell in love with the country in the first place.

cassarilla

Korean Word of the Day

cassarilla:

과일 = fruit

  • 과일가게 = fruit store
  • 과일장수 = fruit seller
  • 풋과일 = unripe fruit

사진: 한국에 과일은 비싸지만 블루베리 오리오는 싸요 (In Korea fruit is expensive but blueberry Oreos are cheap)

polyglottalstop

lavidapoliglota:

note: some of these newspapers I find a little too right-wing for my liking, but then again you might think some of these a little too left-wing, so I’ve tried to provide a mix of links

some of them are definitely too tabloid-y imo

++ this goes w/out saying b/c we’re all…

hello-language-that-is-all
wcitalianonline:

Interested in learning Italian, but don’t have the money to pay for classes? Look no farther! Here you’ll find tons of online resources that’ll have you parlate italiano in no time!
ITALIAN BASICS:
Italian Alphabet Video #1 - This video is meant for adults and therefore, a little dry.
Italian Alphabet Video #2 - This video is meant for children and is a song. If you’re an auditory learner, try this out!
Numbers in Italian
Shopping in Italian
Eating Out in Italian
Italian for Travelers - Very basic Italian that’ll just help you get by.
ENGLISH-ITALIAN DICTIONARIES:
Word Reference
Dictionary.reverso.net
ONLINE ITALIAN WEBSITES:
Italian Language Guide
Italian on About.com
Online Italian Club
ITALIAN GRAMMAR:
Italian Pronouns
Regular and Irregular Verbs
Gender and Number of Italian Nouns
Italian Nouns with Irregular Gender
1001 Italian Verbs
The 3 Tenses You Need to Speak and Understand Italian
MISC. TIPS AND TRICKS:
How to Speak Italian and Not Sound Like A Tourist In Italy
How to Roll Your R’s
Stop Saying It Wrong: Italian Food Words
22 Tips For Learning a Foreign Language
COURSES:
Italian for Beginners
Duolingo
BBC Languages Italian
ONLINE TEXTBOOKS:
APPS:
Learn Italian by Mindsnacks - This is a limited app. To access all features, you’ll have to eventually pay.
Learn Italian - Phrasebook for Travel in Italy
Italian FREE 24/7 Language Learning
Italian English Dictionary + Freemium
TEXTBOOKS:
Learn Italian - Word Power 101

wcitalianonline:

Interested in learning Italian, but don’t have the money to pay for classes? Look no farther! Here you’ll find tons of online resources that’ll have you parlate italiano in no time!

ITALIAN BASICS:

ENGLISH-ITALIAN DICTIONARIES:

ONLINE ITALIAN WEBSITES:

ITALIAN GRAMMAR:

MISC. TIPS AND TRICKS:

COURSES:

ONLINE TEXTBOOKS:

APPS:

TEXTBOOKS:

bakethatlinguist

yukine-chan:

dollsahoy:

kkkkai:

saranae:

theknowledgethebeastandinferno:

This is a great movie.

What I want to say EVERY SINGLE TIME. 

Baristas are paid minimum wage to follow their company’s policies. That includes using whatever terms their company decides on for branding purposes. If you want a frappuccino instead of a frappe, a large instead of a venti, or whatever other thing you wanna call your drink, that’s fine. Your barista? They are paid shitty wages and work shitty hours and have to deal with hundreds of people telling them medium instead of grande, or large instead of venti (which refers to the fact that it is, actually, 20 oz of liquid, meaning you’re being a jackass for no reason).

Your barista isn’t stupid. They know what a fucking ‘large’ is and they know their store’s branding and slang sounds dumb to a lot of people. So how about, instead of being an asshole to a minimum wage worker, you consider why you keep buying $6 coffees instead of making that shit at home.

I’ll say that one more time.

Your barista is not stupid.

They know what a large is, what a medium is, and what a small is.

They also know they can be fired for not toeing the company line. And they can be fired for not standing there and taking the abuse you’re spewing at them.

They are being paid to not fight back. They are being paid to stand there all day and translate medium to grande and venti and large and regular and all while you bitch about the specific words you “have” to use. They are being paid to be welcoming and friendly and nice to you while you call them stupid.

Bitch, I know baristas with Ph.Ds, okay? Back the fuck off.

bless you

dependsoncontext

polnitsch:

rupindah:

In the lovely, ever-confusing English language, there are several words that can be contradictory of themselves, called contronyms. For example, the word “left” can mean you’ve gone, or that you’re still there. “Resign” is often meant to say you’ve quit a…

linguaphilebookofdisquiet

linguaphilebookofdisquiet:

Level 1 Vocabulary: Part 3

人 rén: person

人民币 rén mín bì: yuan, “money of the people”
认识 rènshi: to meet
日rì: sun
日本 rìběn: Japan
容易 róng yì: easy
肉 ròu: meat
三 sān: three
散步 sànbù: to take a walk
嫂子 săozi: sister-in-law, the wife of a friend
商 shāng: trade
商场 shāng chăng: shopping…