foreignfawn

dynamicafrica:

Xhosa Names & Meanings: The “ABC’s of Xhosa Names” by Thandiwe Tshabalala.

South African Illustrator and incredibly talented young creative Thandiwe Tshabalala recently sent me these awesome gifs highlighting and celebrating beautiful names in her mother tongue of Xhosa.

Here’s what she had to say about her series:

"Way back, when apartheid was taking place in South Africa, parents used to give their kids English names so that white people wouldn’t have to struggle pronouncing African names. Most people born during the times of apartheid were given names like: Knowledge, Margaret, Mavis (which has negative connotations), Innocentia, Innocent, Jeffrey, Gloria…eek..Let me just stop there. However, when black folks got their ‘freedom’ back, they went back to naming their children African/South African names."

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All Africa, All the time.

bakethatlinguist

legit-writing-tips:

gaymergirls:

aww nasa has a page for space technology terms you can use in science fiction

nerds

This is actually pretty frickin’ incredible. I love you, NASA. 

polyglotinprogress

language questions!

  • 1. favorite language to speak?
  • 2. favorite language to write in?
  • 3. favorite language to listen to?
  • 4. favorite musician in each language you know?
  • 5. favorite language-classroom-related memory?
  • 6. most embarrassing slip-up?
  • 7. hardest language you've ever studied?
  • 8. weirdest place knowing a foreign language has been useful?
  • 9. funniest translation error you've committed/heard?
  • 10. have you ever dreamed in a language other than your native language?
  • 11. favorite word in your target language(s)?
  • 12. worst language-related classroom memory?
  • 13. weirdest language-related classroom memory?
  • 14. favorite resources/books?
  • 15. have you ever eavesdropped on people just to see if you could understand what they were saying?
  • 16. ¿qué tal?
  • 17. ça va?
  • 18. wie geht's?
  • 19. come sta?
  • 20. nasılsın?
allthingslinguistic
allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.
Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

allthingslinguistic:

Writing Skills: XKCD is on point about language again.

Here’s a study from this year on kids who use abbreviations while texting, and here’s a summary of previous studies: 

The first study, published in 2008, showed that 11 and 12-year-olds in Britain who used more textisms — whether misspelled words (“ppl,” instead of “people”), grammatically incorrect substitutions (“2” for “to” or “too”), wrong verb forms (“he do” instead of “he does”), or missing punctuation — compared to properly written words tended to have slightly better scores on standardized grammar and writing tests and had better spelling, after controlling for test scores in other subjects and other factors. A 2009 study, conducted by some of the same researchers on 88 kids between 10 and 12 years old, found similar associations between high textism use and slightly better reading ability.

Hovertext from the xkcd comic: I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

thegeekwantsout

I’m trying to put together a playlist of music for Spain

thegeekwantsout:

But I can’t have any songs with English in them. Ideally I’d like more Spanish music and soundtracks. Do you guys have any cool movie scores or songs in mind?

Great artists:

Shakira (obviously)
Beyoncé (she does have songs in Spanish)
Maná
Jadel
Julieta Venegas
Soledad
Mancha de Rolando
Rasel
La Oreja de Van Gogh
Jesse & Joy
Ha-Ash
Reik
Luis Fonsi
Natalia Jiménez
Sandra Echeverria
Pepe Aguilar
Don Omar (mostly for Danza Kurduro— learning the dance is mandatory)
Never ever Pitbull. Ever.
Clearly there are more, but this is some of what I listen to. (PS- IU Honors totally rocks.)