bakethatlinguist

yukine-chan:

dollsahoy:

kkkkai:

saranae:

theknowledgethebeastandinferno:

This is a great movie.

What I want to say EVERY SINGLE TIME. 

Baristas are paid minimum wage to follow their company’s policies. That includes using whatever terms their company decides on for branding purposes. If you want a frappuccino instead of a frappe, a large instead of a venti, or whatever other thing you wanna call your drink, that’s fine. Your barista? They are paid shitty wages and work shitty hours and have to deal with hundreds of people telling them medium instead of grande, or large instead of venti (which refers to the fact that it is, actually, 20 oz of liquid, meaning you’re being a jackass for no reason).

Your barista isn’t stupid. They know what a fucking ‘large’ is and they know their store’s branding and slang sounds dumb to a lot of people. So how about, instead of being an asshole to a minimum wage worker, you consider why you keep buying $6 coffees instead of making that shit at home.

I’ll say that one more time.

Your barista is not stupid.

They know what a large is, what a medium is, and what a small is.

They also know they can be fired for not toeing the company line. And they can be fired for not standing there and taking the abuse you’re spewing at them.

They are being paid to not fight back. They are being paid to stand there all day and translate medium to grande and venti and large and regular and all while you bitch about the specific words you “have” to use. They are being paid to be welcoming and friendly and nice to you while you call them stupid.

Bitch, I know baristas with Ph.Ds, okay? Back the fuck off.

bless you

dependsoncontext

polnitsch:

rupindah:

In the lovely, ever-confusing English language, there are several words that can be contradictory of themselves, called contronyms. For example, the word “left” can mean you’ve gone, or that you’re still there. “Resign” is often meant to say you’ve quit a…

linguaphilebookofdisquiet

linguaphilebookofdisquiet:

Level 1 Vocabulary: Part 3

人 rén: person

人民币 rén mín bì: yuan, “money of the people”
认识 rènshi: to meet
日rì: sun
日本 rìběn: Japan
容易 róng yì: easy
肉 ròu: meat
三 sān: three
散步 sànbù: to take a walk
嫂子 săozi: sister-in-law, the wife of a friend
商 shāng: trade
商场 shāng chăng: shopping…

sprinkleofhappydust

Korean Books PDF files

littlelinguaphile

whosaprettypolyglot:

I find it really interesting how Romance languages have a whole variety of different ways of writing the /ɲ/ sound even in cognates

like if we just look at the word for “Spanish” we have

español (Spanish)
espagnol (French)
espanhol (Portuguese)
espanyol (Catalan)
spaniol (Romanian)

which are all pronounced basically the same (mostly, couple of little differences elsewhere)

I dunno this post is pointless I just find it rly cool okay

foreignfawn
romancingthelanguages:

Colors in several languages | Thule towbars
Today while translating very sexy things (ok no, car stuff) I found this colors chart, as it was available at the internet so I feel like tunning it and sharing with you. I find it so interesting.
[source: (Nissan - Qashqai 2014)] 

romancingthelanguages:

Colors in several languages | Thule towbars

Today while translating very sexy things (ok no, car stuff) I found this colors chart, as it was available at the internet so I feel like tunning it and sharing with you. I find it so interesting.

[source: (Nissan - Qashqai 2014)]